Disproportionate Evaluative Rigor and the Three Laws of Data

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R.I.P. Jerry Coleman

Radio HOF broadcaster for the Padres. A great play-by-play announcer with a truly signature voice, he was also a U.S. Marine and American war hero..

One of Top Ten Op-ed’s this year: Why Garfield teachers boycotted the MAP test

Seattle Education

Scrap the map9

 

The Seattle Times just posted their top ten most-read opinion pieces of the year and Garfield High School teacher Jesse Hagopian was on the list at #8.

And guess what? All of those corporate reform pieces penned by the Seattle Times staff and our local Gates representatives in the guise of the League of Education Voters (LEV), Stand for Children (SFC) and the Alliance for Education (A4E) “thought leaders” that came out on a routine basis this year? Zero.

That’s one for the home team.

To follow is the op-ed:

Why Garfield teachers boycotted the MAP test

WALKING the same halls once trod by Jimi Hendrix, Quincy Jones, Bruce Lee, Brandon Roy and Macklemore makes teaching at Garfield High School exhilarating.

When I look at the students in my history classes, I see young people who may be the next to turn the world inside out. Garfield has a long tradition of cultivating…

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Beware of Data Sharing Cheerleaders Offering Webinars

EWA have been the primary example of being seduced by the reformers. They are seemingly unable to critically look at data.

deutsch29

Perhaps the most sobering component of the privatization push is its unprecedented demand for data collection (data “mining”) on American students. Data mining is not just an American issue. However, on the American front, two education activists have been at the forefront of the fight against this mammoth student data collection: Louisiana’s Jason France (here’s a great example of his writing on the subject) and New York’s Leonie Haimson (her is her testimony on student data/privacy issues in a September 2013 New York city council meeting).

(For those unfamiliar with the data mining issue, see this concise yet thorough summary on the WhatIsCommonCore blog.)

US Secretary of Education Arne Duncan believes that there is “power” in data for “school reform”.

Indeed there is. The issue isn’t whether there is “power” in data collection and storage, and its potential sharing. There certainly is power. That is precisely why the public…

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2013 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

Madison Square Garden can seat 20,000 people for a concert. This blog was viewed about 66,000 times in 2013. If it were a concert at Madison Square Garden, it would take about 3 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

Guest post: my mom, a retired English teacher, reflects on recent changes in education

teacherbiz

Here’s a guest post by my mom, a former Teacher of the Year, who laments the effects education “reform” is having on students, teachers, and education in general:  

I began teaching in 1973. I retired July 1, 2013.  I taught every grade and every level of secondary English (yes, we called it English, not language arts or LAL) during my career, which I loved with a passion.  I am so fortunate to have had a profession I felt so devoted to, one that allowed me to engage with everything I loved: literature, writing, and young people of diverse backgrounds, interests and abilities. I have often though that without my rich career and all I have learned from it, I might be a much different person, much poorer in my understanding of human nature, adolescence, history, sociology, the arts, the creative process, and the complexity surrounding every facet of learning…

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What does Rick Hess say that “Common Core” is all about?

GFBrandenburg's Blog

(Who’s he? you may ask. He’s one of Michelle Rhee’s friends, or so he writes; he’s also a well-paid shill for the American Enterprise Institute, which you can look up yourself.)

He wrote, regarding the real purpose of the Common Core “State” Standards, revealing exactly why many teachers and others oppose them:

In truth, the idea that the Common Core might be a “game-changer” has little to do with the Common Core standards themselves, and everything to do with stuff attached to them, especially the adoption of common tests that make it possible to readily compare schools, programs, districts, and states (of course, the announcement that one state after another is opting out of the two testing consortia is hollowing out this promise).

But the Common Core will only make a dramatic difference if those test results are used to evaluate schools or hire, pay, or…

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