Ed Reformers now think they are like American Idol #edreform #netDE #sad @DianeRavitch #edreformidol #iDIDNTmakeUPthatLASThashtag

Well, I guess it doesn’t really surprise me, these self indulgent policy wonks and state bureaucrats are just in it for themselves, especially the judges methinks.

This is truly disgusting, narcissistic behavior all done on the backs of children. Glad that DE is not a participant, but surprised Jack Markell isn’t a judge

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Education Reform Idol: The Reformiest State 2011

Education Reform Idol: The Reformiest State 2011

August 11, 2011
8:30am
Thomas B. Fordham Institute, 1016 16th Street NW Floor 7, Washington DC, 20036
Register to attend

Education Reform Idol:
The Reformiest State 2011
Please join us for Education Reform Idol, where leaders from five cutting-edge states will battle for the honor of “Reformiest State 2011.” This Fordham Institute panel will pit Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Wisconsin against one another in what should prove to be the biggest education policy event this summer. The winner will be determined by a vote of the in-person and online audience.
Contestants
dr_bennett_headsot_2x3.jpg Tony Bennett, Indiana Superintendent of Public Instruction
Lehner_photo.jpg Peggy Lehner, Ohio State Senator, 6th District
PL-2010-HeadShot.jpg Patricia Levesque, Executive Director, Foundation for Florida’s Future
Murray-Headshot.jpg Ryan Murray, Policy and Legislative Affairs Director, Office of Governor Scott Walker, Wisconsin
Robin-(smile)---2010.jpg Robin M. Steans, Executive Director, Advance Illinois
Judges
Jeanne-Allen-Headshot.jpg Jeanne Allen, President, Center for Education Reform
colvin.jpg Richard Lee Colvin, Executive Director, Education Sector
Bruno-Manno1.jpg Bruno V. Manno, Senior Advisor, Systematic K-12 Education Reform Focus Area, Walton Family Foundation
Host
20110608_Petrilli_03.jpg Michael J. Petrilli, Executive Vice President, Thomas B. Fordham Institute
Register
or call 202-223-5452
EVENT DETAILS

Thursday, August 11, 2011
8:30 a.m.– 10 a.m.*
Thomas B. Fordham Institute
1016 16th Street NW, 7th Floor
Washington, DC 20036

*Light breakfast provided

This eventwill be webcast. No need to sign up – simply visit our website, www.edexcellence.net, at 8:30 a.m. on August 11 and watch the proceedings live.

No need to register to watch the webcast, just bookmark this page to view the event on August 11, 2011 at 8:30 a.m. We look forward to you joining us. If you have a question for the panelists please email your question to questions@edexcellence.net. You can follow the competition online via twitter #edreformidol

Obama administration reaches out to education activists before march – The Answer Sheet – The Washington Post #netDE

Update: Obama administration reaches out to education activists before march – The Answer Sheet – The Washington Post

 

Update: Obama administration reaches out to education activists before march

Two days before thousands of teachers, parents and education activists are staging a march in Washington to protest the Obama administration’s education reform policies, U.S. officials have invited some leaders of the event to the White House for a discussion.

March leaders say they planned the event to let the administration know that teachers, principals, parents and others are fed up with reform policies that they believe are turning public schools into testing factories and that are unfairly evaluating teachers based on student test scores.

Three of a larger group of protesters who went to the Education Department on Wednesday to create an artistic display in front of the building were invited to meet with Education Secretary Arne Duncan, and they handed him a specially made gift of a baby in a box, to symbolize protesters’ concern that high-stakes standardized testing is “boxing in children.”

Education Department spokesman Justin Hamilton said the discussion was useful.

According to leaders of the Save Our Schools March, the White House has invited several of them to the White House on Friday, just a day before the march takes place. A two-day conference of activists began today at American University.

March leaders have been writing open letters to the administration about their standardized test-driven school reform policies for months, but it is just now, apparently, that officials are interested in talking to them about their protest.

Is this a repeat of the administration’s efforts last summer to blunt criticism by a coalition of civil rights groups who released a framework for education reform that was critical of administration policies? Just before it was released, administration officials met with some of the leaders of the group in the coalition, and afterward some backed off their criticism.

Or is this a legitimate effort to allow administration officials to hear teachers complaints (even though they’ve had many months to invite them to the White House, and even though officials have some other pressing business — like the debt limit crisis — to deal with)?

Duncan frequently has conversations with educators across the country. Earlier this month, he phoned Carol Corbett Burris, principal of high-achieving South Side High School in New York, after she wrote an open letter to him about her concerns about his school reform agenda. (You can read her account of the conversation here.)

Burris will be one of the educators marching Saturday.

 

We are in Washington to Save Our Schools and We Want Answers! – Living in Dialogue – Education Week Teacher #netDE

We are in Washington to Save Our Schools and We Want Answers! – Living in Dialogue – Education Week Teacher

We are in Washington to Save Our Schools and We Want Answers!

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For me, the journey to today’s Save Our Schools March started when I wrote an open letter to President Obama raising serious questions about where we are headed with education reform in America. Those questions have still not been answered.

Yesterday I had a chance to ask Arne Duncan a question, after his “Working Toward ‘Wow'” speech. What I asked him was this:

I worked in high poverty schools in Oakland for 24 years. The turnover rate for our interns is 75% after three years. Your proposal for the reauthorization of ESEA continues to label the bottom 10% of our schools as failures. Under these circumstances, who will choose to teach in these high poverty schools? Doesn’t this contribute to the crisis in our profession?

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Though Secretary Duncan responded, I did not get an actual answer to my question, as to who will choose to teach in these schools.

Here are some more questions we must ask.

No Child Left Behind was a huge national experiment based on the so-called Texas Miracle, which turned out to be a hoax.

When current policies are questioned we are told similar stories about schools that supposedly are “beating the odds,” and thus prove what is possible.

The National Academy of Science recently released a report that showed that nearly a decade of test-based reforms have shown no positive effect on real student learning. Study after study shows that paying teachers for test scores does not work – even to raise those scores. Evaluating people based on test scores has not worked. Closing schools and firing people to improve schools has not worked. When will the Department of Education begin basing its policies on sound research rather than exceptional cases, many of which turn out to be poor models in any case?

Over a year ago, Secretary Duncan and President Obama praised the decision by the administration to fire the entire staff of teachers at Central Falls High School. Though there was a subsequent agreement that reversed this decision, morale plummeted, student disrespect for teachers increased and teacher turnover rose. How is this any sort of a strategy for school improvement?

Many of the core elements of Race to the Top and the Blueprint are related to test scores. Department of Ed policy calls for the linking of teacher evaluations and pay to student test scores. The Blueprint calls for tracking of student test scores of teachers according to the place they were prepared. We still have the threat of reconstitution hanging over the bottom tier of schools, attended exclusively by children in poverty. All based on test scores. In March, President Obama described the tests that Sasha and Malia take as “low stakes.” All these changes RAISE the stakes on the tests, for teachers and schools. How does this move us towards the “less pressure-packed environment” the President has advocated?

Yesterday Secretary Duncan suggested that teachers be paid as much as $150,000 a year. Afterwards, some National Board certified teachers from Detroit told me that as a result of the latest crisis, they are about to LOSE $15,000 to $20,000 in pay and benefits. What fiscal planet is Secretary Duncan on? And since he has no capacity to actually impact teacher pay, what difference does it make in the real world when he says our pay should be increased?

How about supporting processes that empower teachers to take leadership? How about real support for teacher action research? How about leveraging collaboration to reduce turnover and build stability? How about building teacher accountability on a foundation of real responsibility and agency, rather than bribes and threats? How about policies that reduce, rather than accelerate, racial and economic segregation?

We have been asking questions like this for more than a year, and the answers we get are maddeningly devoid of insight.

The answers to the challenges facing our schools will not be heard from Secretary Duncan. He has been given many chances to respond, and all we get is nonsense. We want answers and today, we are marching to the White House to demand them.

Note: Blogger Alice Mercer will be providing streaming audio from today’s events around the country, starting at 11 am. Find out more here.